GKA EDU 2020

Key Dates

Congress: June 24-26, 2020.

CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE
1st CFP until July 10, 2019
2nd CFP until November 8, 2019
3rd CFP until February 10, 2020
FINAL CFP until May 10, 2020
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Super Discount Rate until July 24, 2019
Early Rate until November 22, 2019
Normal Rate until February 24, 2020
Final Rate until May 24, 2020

Congress: June 24-26, 2020.

CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE
1st CFP until July 10, 2019
2nd CFP until November 8, 2019
3rd CFP until February 10, 2020
FINAL CFP until May 10, 2020
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Super Discount Rate until July 24, 2019
Early Rate until November 22, 2019
Normal Rate until February 24, 2020
Final Rate until May 24, 2020

Highlighted Theme

Education in the Context of Global Migration

In 2017, there were a total of 258 million migrants out of a total worldwide population of 7.5 billion people.  The worldwide population of migrant children under the age of 19 has grown from 30 million in 1990 to 36 million in 2017.  Who are these migrant children and why do they migrate?  There are complex reasons why children are migrants.   For example, some migrant children are seeking asylum while others are seeking refugee status, and then there are the millions of children of migrant workers.  Still other migrant children are educational migrants sent by their families to study abroad. While much research focuses on transnational migration, there is considerable migration of children and families within many countries from rural to urban centers due to urbanization and industrialization.  In all, children around the world are migrating for a wide range of diverse reasons.

There are a host of policy, programmatic, and service challenges facing governments at the national, regional, and local level to address the needs of migrant children.  One of these concerns has to do with the economic well-being of migrant children and their families.  While migrants have generally, very high rates of labor force participation, they nonetheless, often work for lower wages and have less income than native-born citizens.  Migrant children in these families are more likely to be poor, experience food insecurity, have less or inadequate health care, and live in crowded or unsafe housing. Not the least of these challenges is that of providing educational programs and services for migrant children.  Effective educational programs and services for migrant children is an economic imperative.  The more successful migrant children are academically in school, the more likely they will be successful in future employment and in upward social-class mobility thus, contributing the economic well-being and social fabric of the state and the nation. While the economic well-being of migrant families and their children is of concern, other factors associated with race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and language acquisition, may also affect the educational attainment of migrant children.  Addressing the educational needs of migrant children will depend on the local context and the particular characteristics of the migrant population of students.

In this edition of the Congress, we especially welcome research papers, policy papers, and presentations related to a broad range of questions and topics associated with the education of migrant children.  What are the contemporary theories, theoretical paradigms, and/or educational practices relevant to the education of migrant children?  What are legal, policy, and procedural issues at the national, state, and local level related to migrant children?  What are the pedagogical best practices associated with the education of migrant children?  What are the issues related to technology, technology access, and social media and the education of migrant children? What are the preparation, training, and professional development needs of administrators, teachers, and staff in the education of migrant children?  How can families and communities contribute to the education of migrant children? What are the political, economic, and social implications in the education of migrant children?  We also welcome research papers, policy papers, and presentations related to the other strands of the Congress.

Themes

Policies, Legislation and History of Education

  • Educational policy, educational legislation, and the history of education in local contexts.
  • Educational policy, educational legislation, and the history of education in the international context. Comparative education.
  • Educational reforms.
  • State and education.
  • Education rights.
  • Education and public life.
  • The crisis of education.
  • Educational systems.
  • Democratization in education.

The Educational Stages and their Curriculum

  • Education in the different stages of education.
  • Early childhood education.
  • Primary education.
  • Secondary education. High school education.
  • Vocational education. Medium and high grades.
  • Baccalaureate.
  • Higher education.
  • Universities. Colleges. Special schools with university status.
  • Masters and postgraduates.
  • Doctorates.
  • Languages.

Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning

  • Adult education.
  • Literacy and regulated training.
  • Universities. Colleges.
  • Informal education. Different proposals for lifelong training.
  • Education for job placement.
  • Vocational training and professional training.
  • Outplacement.
  • Long distance education. Online learning. Interactive and autonomous learning.
  • Education lead by different public and private organizations and institutions.

Psychology of Education and Learning

  • Psychopedagogy and educational guidance.
  • Evolutionary psychology.
  • Psychology of education.
  • Social psychology and sociology applied to education.
  • Difficulties and learning disorders.
  • Difficulties and behavioral disorders.
  • Difficulties and developmental disorders.
  • High learning capabilities.
  • Educational intervention programs.
  • Work-professional intervention programs.
  • Children in situations of social exclusion: child maltreatment.
  • Coeducation. Integrated, inclusive, and segregated education. Sexism in education.
  • Desertion and school failure.

 Educational Methodologies

  • Student assessment. Summative and formative assessments.
  • Teacher assessment.
  • The teaching profession.
  • Training, improvement and updating of teachers.
  • The work of teachers. Roles and responsibilities.
  • The teacher as manager of personal resources and materials.
  • Teaching methods (didactics, research, collaboration).
  • Traditional and innovative learning methodologies. The active methodology.
  • Learning contexts and tools.
  • Educational environment. The classroom atmosphere.
  • Buildings and school architecture.
  • Resources, tools and educational materials.
  • Resource centers for learning and research.
  • The role of libraries in learning literacy.
  • Partner agencies and entities in education.

Science, Technology and Innovation in Education

  • The teaching of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, and other sciences.
  • Learning about the natural environment.
  • Education 3.0.
  • E-learning. B-learning.
  • The flipped classroom.
  • Augmented reality. Immersive reality. Mixed reality.
  • Project-based learning.
  • 3D technology.
  • Robotics.
  • Gamification.
  • Transmedia storytelling
  • Mobile learning. Educational apps.
  • Parental control. Cybersecurity.
  • The use of Moocs.
  • The use of educational platforms.
  • Other innovative technological proposals.
  • Information and communication technologies.
  • Learning and knowledge technologies.
  • Empowerment and participation technologies.
  • Digital literacy. The digital divide.
  • Responsible use of new technologies. Treatment of new addictions.

Leadership and Management of Educational Centers

  • Internal school organization:
    • The organization of teachers in schools.
    • The interdepartmental and intradepartamental organization.
    • The organization with the management team.
  • External school organization:
    • Family-school relationship processes.
    • Collaboration processes with other public and private bodies.
    • Relationship with the educational administration.
    • Relationship processes with other educational centers.
  • The teacher as a leader in the classroom.
  • Leadership and strategic direction in educational centers.
  • Models and styles of leadership.
  • Assessment and measurement of educational quality.
  • Improvement plans as quality generators of the teaching-learning process.

Social Aspects of Education

  • Emotional education.
  • Education for health.
  • School hygiene.
  • Physical education.
  • Children, health, food, and eating (disorders).
  • Identity and diversity.
  • Multicultural and intercultural education. Inclusive education.
  • Special education. Disability.
  • Sex education.
  • Moral education. Education in values.
  • Education for peace.
  • Consumer education.
  • Education for equality.
  • Road-safety education.
  • Environmental and sustainable education.
  • Family education. Society, family and school.
  • Homeschooling. Homeschool. Home-based education.
  • School for parents. The role of the family in education.